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Types of Glove

Types of Glove

Commercial and industrial

A disposable nitrile rubber glove

Sport and recreational

Dry scuba gloves

Racing drivers gloves

Three finger army shooting gloves.

  • American football various position gloves
  • Archer's glove
  • Baseball glove or catcher's mitt: in baseball, the players in the field wear gloves to help them catch the ball and prevent injury to their hands.
  • Billiards glove
  • Boxing gloves: a specialized padded mitten
  • Cricket gloves
    • The batsmen wear gloves with heavy padding on the back, to protect the fingers in case of being struck with the ball.
    • The wicket keeper wears large webbed gloves.
  • Cycling gloves
  • Driving gloves intended to improve the grip on the steering wheel. Driving gloves have external seams, open knuckles, open backs, ventilation holes, short cuffs, and wrist snaps. The most luxurious are made from Peccary gloving leather.[21]
  • Eton Fives glove
  • Falconry glove
  • Fencing glove
  • FootballGoalkeeper glove
  • Gardening glove
  • Golf glove
  • Ice hockey glove
  • Gym gloves
  • Riding gloves
  • Racquetball gloves
  • Lacrosse gloves
  • Kendo Kote
  • LED gloves
  • Motorcycling gloves
  • Oven gloves – or Oven mitts, used when cooking
  • Paintball Glove
  • Racing drivers gloves with long cuffs, intended for protection against heat and flame for drivers in automobile competitions.[22]
  • Scuba diving gloves:
    • Cotton gloves; good abrasion, but no thermal protection
    • Dry gloves; made of rubber with a latex wrist seal to prevent water entry
    • Wet gloves; made of neoprene and allowing restricted water entry
  • Shooting glove
    • Biathlon glove – an articulated padded combination of a skiing glove and a shooting glove,[23] offers cold temperature protection outside in winter, as well as padding to support the .22lr ammunition single-action / Fortner-action biathlon rifle, and is suitable for using with poles in cross country skiing.
    • Pistol glove – used in competition pistol shooting to improve performance and cushion the shooting hand.
    • Target rifle glove – open-fingered heavily padded one-hand (non-shooting) glove with non-skid surfaces, used to support the rifle in prone shooting position. Also may be used in kneeling, sitting and standing positions. The glove cushions and distributes the weight of the rifle, which varies from 3 kilograms (6.6 lb) to 7 kilograms (15 lb), depending on type of rifle stock used.

Touchscreen gloves, fingertip type

  • Skiing gloves are padded and reinforced to protect from the cold, and from injury by skis.
  • Touchscreen gloves – made with conductive material to enable the wearer's natural electric capacitance to interact with capacitive touchscreen devices without the need to remove one's gloves
    • Finger tip conductivity; where conductive yarns or a conductive patch is found only on the tips of the fingers (typically the index finger and thumb) thus allowing for basic touch response
    • Full hand conductivity; where the entire glove is made from conductive materials allowing for robust tactile touch and dexterity good for accurate typing and multi-touch response
  • Underwater Hockey gloves – with protective padding, usually of silicone rubber or latex, across the back of the fingers and knuckles to protect from impact with the puck; usually only one, either left- or right-hand, is worn depending on which is the playing hand.
  • Washing mitt or Washing glove: a tool for washing the body (one's own, or of a child, a patient, a lover).
  • Webbed gloves – a swim training device or swimming aid.
  • Weightlifting gloves
  • Wired glove
  • Wheelchair gloves – for users of manual Wheelchairs

Fashion

Main article: Evening glove

Western lady's gloves for formal and semi-formal wear come in three lengths: wrist ("matinee"), elbow, and opera or full-length (over the elbow, reaching to the biceps). Satin and stretch satin are popular and mass-produced. Some women wear gloves as part of "dressy" outfits, such as for church and weddings. Long white gloves are common accessories for teenage girls attending formal events such as prom, quinceañera, cotillion, or formal ceremonies at church, such as confirmation.

In Japan, white gloves are worn frequently. Work-oriented white gloves are worn for activities such as gardening and cleanup; "dress" white gloves are worn by professionals who want a clean public appearance, such as taxi drivers, police, politicians and elevator operators.[24] However white gloves are not recommended for touching old books and similar antiquities.[25][26]

Fingerless gloves

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Leather fingerless gloves

Fingerless gloves or "glovelettes" are garments worn on the hands which resemble regular gloves in most ways, except that the finger columns are half-length and opened, allowing the top-half of the wearer's fingers to be shown.

Fingerless gloves are often padded in the palm area, to provide protection to the hand, and the exposed fingers do not interfere with sensation or gripping. In contrast to traditional full gloves, often worn for warmth, fingerless gloves will often have a ventilated back to allow the hands to cool; this is commonly seen in weightlifting gloves.

Fingerless gloves are worn by bicyclists and motorcyclists to better grip the handlebars, as well as by skateboarders and rollerbladers, to protect the palms of the hands and add grip in the event of a fall. Some anglers, particularly fly fishermen, favour fingerless gloves to allow manipulation of line and tackle in cooler conditions. Fingerless gloves are common among marching band members, particularly those who play the clarinet or open-hole flute, due to the difficulty of covering small holes whilst wearing gloves. The lack of fabric on the fingertips allows for better use of touchscreens, as on smartphones and tablet computers. Professional MMA fighters are required to wear fingerless gloves in fights.

Leather gloves

Motorcycle riding gloves, gray deerskin, some points reinforced

Lined black leather gloves with red leather fourchettes

A leather glove is a fitted covering for the hand with a separate sheath for each finger and the thumb. This covering is composed of the tanned hide of an animal (with the hair removed), though in recent years it is more common for the leather to be synthetic.

Common uses

Leather gloves have been worn by people for thousands of years. The unique properties of leather allow for both a comfortable fit and useful grip for the wearer. The grain present on the leather and the pores present in the leather gives the gloves the unique ability to assist the wearer as they grip an object. As soft as a leather glove may be, its pores and grain provide a level of friction when "gripped" against an item or surface.

A common use for leather gloves is sporting events. In baseball, a baseball glove is an oversized leather glove with a web used for fielding the ball. Leather gloves are also used in handball, cycling, and American football.

Early Formula One racing drivers used steering wheels taken directly from road cars. They were normally made from wood, necessitating the use of driving gloves.[19]

Leather gloves provide protection from occupational hazards. For example, beekeepers use leather gloves to avoid being stung by bees. Construction workers might use leather gloves for added grip and for protecting their hands. Welders use gloves too for protection against electrical shocks, extreme heat, ultraviolet and infrared.

Criminals have been known to wear leather gloves during the commission of crimes. Gloves are worn by criminals because the tactile properties of the leather allow for good grip and dexterity. These properties are the result of a grain present on the surface of the leather. The grain makes the surface of the leather unique to each glove. Investigators are able to dust for the glove prints left behind from the leather the same way in which they dust for fingerprints.[27][28]

Leather dress gloves

Main types of gloving leather

Leather is a natural product with special characteristics that make it comfortable to wear, and give it great strength and flexibility. Because it is a natural product, with its own unique variations, every piece has its own individual characteristics. As they are worn and used, leather gloves (especially if they fit snugly) will conform to the wearer's hand. As this occurs the leather of the glove will become more malleable, and thus softer and more supple. This process is known as 'breaking-in' the glove. Overtime wear spots may appear on certain parts of the palm and fingertips, due to the constant use of those areas of the glove. Creases and wrinkles will appear on the palm side of the leather glove and will generally correspond to the locations of the hinge joints of the wearer's hands, including the interphalangeal articulations of hand, metacarpophalangeal joints, intercarpal articulations, and wrists.

Because the leather is natural as well as delicate, the wearer must take precaution as to not damage them. The constant handling of damp or wet surfaces will discolor lighter-colored gloves and stiffen the leather of any glove. The wearer will often unknowingly damage or stain their gloves while doing such tasks as twisting a wet door knob or wiping a running nose with a gloved hand.[29]

Leather dress gloves that are worn very tight and possess very short, elasticized wrists, are most often referred to as cop gloves or law enforcement gloves because of their prevalence as issued duty gloves for many law enforcement agencies. It is common attire in leather subculture and BDSM communities.

  • Lambskin is widely used for fashion gloves and it is casual and country gloves. It is the most used material for gloves made in Europe in the known as French style.[citation needed]
  • Cowhide is often used for lower-priced gloves. This leather is generally considered too thick and bulky for the majority of glove styles, particularly finer dress gloves. It is, however, used for some casual styles of glove.
  • Deerskin has the benefit of great strength and elasticity, but has a more rugged appearance, with more grain on the surface, than "hairsheep". It is very hard-wearing and heavier in weight.
  • Goatskin is occasionally used for gloves. It is hard-wearing but coarser than other leathers and is normally used for cheaper gloves.
  • Hairsheep originates from sheep that grow hair, not wool. Hairsheep leather is finer and less bulky than other leathers. Its major benefits are softness of touch, suppleness, strength, and lasting comfort. It is very durable and is particularly suited for the manufacture of dress gloves.
  • Peccary is the world's rarest and most luxurious gloving leather. Peccary leather is very soft, difficult to sew, and hard-wearing.[30]
  • Sheepskin, also called shearling, is widely used for casual and country gloves. It is very warm in cold weather, and as a leather reversed, it has still attached wool on the inside.
  • Slink lamb is used only in the most expensive lambskin gloves. Some of the finest lambskin comes from New Zealand.[citation needed]

Leather glove linings

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  • Cashmere is warm, light in weight, and very comfortable to wear. Cashmere yarn comes from the hair of mountain goats, whose fleece allows them to survive the extreme weather conditions they are exposed to.
  • Silk is warm in winter and cool in summer and is used both in men's and women's gloves, but is more popular in women's.
  • Wool is well known for its natural warmth and comfort, as well as having a natural elasticity.
  • Other linings, which include wool mixtures and acrylics.

Component parts

The component parts that may be found in a leather dress glove are one pair of tranks, one pair of thumbs, four whole fourchettes, four half fourchettes, two gussets, and six quirks. Depending on the style of the glove there may also be roller pieces, straps, rollers, eyelets, studs, sockets and domes. Finally, linings will themselves consist of tranks, thumbs and fourchettes.

Stitching

The most popular types of leather glove sewing stitches used today are:

  • Hand stitched, which is most popular in men's gloves and some women's styles. Hand stitching is a very time-consuming and skilled process.
  • Inseam, which is mainly used on women's gloves, but occasionally on men's dress gloves.[clarification needed]

Some glove terms

  • Button length is the measurement in inches that is used to determine the length/measurement from the base of the glove thumb to the cuff of the glove.
  • Fourchettes are the inside panels on the fingers of some glove styles.
  • Perforations are small holes that are punched in the leather. They are often added for better ventilation, grip, or aesthetics and can be as fine as a pin hole.
  • Points are the three, or sometimes single, line of decorative stitching on the back of the glove.
  • Quirks are found on only the most expensive hand sewn gloves. They are small diamond shaped pieces of leather sewn at the base of the fingers, where they are attached to the hand of the glove to improve the fit.
  • A strap and roller is used to adjust the closeness of the fit around the wrist.
  • A Vent is the 'V' shaped cut out of the glove, sometimes at the back, but more often on the palm, to give the glove an easier fit around the wrist.

Driving gloves

Rick Mastracchio's damaged glove during STS-118

Driving gloves are designed for holding a steering wheel and transmitting the feeling of the road to the driver. They provide a good feel and protect the hands. They are designed to be worn tight and to not interfere with hand movements. The increased grip allows for more control and increased safety at speed.[31]

True driver's gloves offer tactile advantages to drivers frequently handling a car near the limits of adhesion. Made of soft leather, drivers gloves are unlined with external seams.

Further information: Driving glove

Mittens

Saami mittens

Gloves which cover the entire hand but do not have separate finger openings or sheaths are called mittens. Generally, mittens still separate the thumb from the other four fingers. They have different colours and designs. Mittens have a higher thermal efficiency than gloves as they have a smaller surface area exposed to the cold.[32]

The earliest mittens known to archeologists date to around 1000 A.D.[33] in Latvia. Mittens continue to be part of Latvian national costume today.[34] Wool biodegrades quickly, so it is likely that earlier mittens, possibly in other countries, may have existed but were not preserved. An exception is the specimen found during the excavations of the Early Medieval trading town of Dorestad in the Netherlands. In the harbour area a mitten of wool was discovered dating from the 8th or early 9th century.[35]

Many people around the Arctic Circle have used mittens, including other Baltic peoples, Native Americans[36] and Vikings.[37] Mittens are a common sight on ski slopes, as they not only provide extra warmth but extra protection from injury.[38]

Ergonomic design

See also: Human factors in diving equipment design § Gloves

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Safety standards

Several European standards relate to gloves. These include:

Antivibration protective gloves.

  • EN 388: Protective against mechanical risks (abrasion / cut / tear / puncture)
  • EN 374: Protective against chemical and microorganisms
  • EN 420: General requirements for gloves includes sizing and a number of health and safety aspects including latex protein and chromium levels.
  • EN 60903: Electric shock
  • EN 407: Heat resistance
  • EN 511: Cold resistance
  • EN 1149: Antistatic
  • EN 10819: Anti Vibration gloves (TRM – Transmission Ratio Medium frequency range, TRH – Transmission Ratio High frequency range)

These exist to fulfill Personal protective equipment (PPE) requirements.

PPE places gloves into three categories:

  • Minimal risk – End user can easily identify risk. Risk is low.
  • Complex design – Used in situations that can cause serious injury or death.
  • Intermediate – Gloves that don't fit into minimal risk or complex design categories.


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Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Glove



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